WorldCat Identities

Hayman, Andy

Overview
Works: 11 works in 22 publications in 2 languages and 171 library holdings
Genres: Documentary television programs  Nonfiction television programs  Documentary films  Nonfiction films  Historical television programs 
Roles: Author, Composer
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Andy Hayman
The terrorist hunters by Andy Hayman( Book )

6 editions published between 2009 and 2011 in English and held by 131 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Andy Hayman leaves no holds barred in his analysis of the way law enforcers tackle terrorism. He outlines his radical blueprint for the future to protect the public, in the run-up to the 2012 Olympic Games and beyond. If you thought you knew the stories behind the news, you'll realise you didn't until you read this book.--Publisher
The liquid bomb plot( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the story of the biggest terror plot since 9/11, told by the people who stopped it. The plot involved exploding devices disguised as soft drinks and, if it had succeeded, would have blown planes from the sky killing 2,000 people in a single night. Traveling between the upper ranks of Washington, the streets of Pakistan and the inner cities of Britain, this documentary brings together the work of the UK police, MI5, the CIA, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Pakistani officials and others in their efforts to stop the bombers
Fantasy by Andy Hayman( Recording )

6 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in 3 languages and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Service stalemate by Andy Hayman( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Blow my mind by Appleton( Recording )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Anyone by Appleton( Recording )

1 edition published in 2003 in Italian and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

[Peter Clarke, Deputy Assistant Commissioner of London Metropolitan Police Anti-terrorism Branch, and Andy Hayman, Assistant Commissioner of London Metropolitan Police Specialist Operations speak to the press on the investigation of London suicide bombings and the arrest of one of the suspects] by Peter Clarke( Recording )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Excerpt of a press conference on the suicide bombings in London. Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clark and Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman tell the press what they have discovered on the suicide bombers; which ones died in the bombings themselves and which ones have been arrested. Peter Clark also thanks the public for their support and assistance
The terrorist hunters by Andy Hayman and Margaret Gilmore by Andy Hayman( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Talking tactics by Andy Hayman( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Terrorist Hunters. ; The Definitive Inside Story of Britain's Fight Against Terror by Andy Hayman( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Four Corners : Bad News( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For more than five years Rupert Murdoch and his most trusted executives told the world that a rogue reporter and a rogue private detective were responsible for hacking phones for the News of the World. Reporter Sarah Ferguson investigates that claim and reveals the links between Murdoch's newspapers and the British criminal world going back two decades. What do you do when you're a journalist with an editor demanding an exclusive story to put on the front page? At Britain's now defunct News of the World you employed a foul-mouthed private investigator with a criminal record to get you information that would provide you with a scoop. Phone hacking was a speciality but there were other methods too, including corrupting police who would provide the kind of private information guaranteed to win the reporter a prime spot in the paper. This week on Four Corners, Sarah Ferguson tells the story of a key private investigator at the heart of the scandals that have set Rupert Murdoch's empire rocking on its axis. Detailing records of police surveillance and interviews with people who had been targeted by the investigator Ferguson pieces together how he worked. As the investigation unfolds it becomes clear that phone hacking and illegal information theft were not done on behalf of one "rogue" reporter or one newspaper. Instead, the evidence suggests these surveillance activities were being done on an industrial scale - sometimes by people with criminal backgrounds - for anyone who had the cash to pay for it. As Tony Blair's former press secretary, Alastair Campbell, told Four Corners: "It seems they were in a sense replacing journalists... possibly to cut costs, but the other reason you assume is because it meant the private detectives could do things the journalists can't." Campbell has good reason to make such a claim. Four Corners has been told by a News insider that the practice of phone hacking and the gathering of illegal information was so widely accepted that at the News of the World competing sections of the paper used different private investigators to do their dirty work. Meanwhile, News executives stuck to the company line of one rogue reporter. As one British MP puts it: "You know what they say about lies: if you say it loud enough and often enough people begin to believe it and they nearly got away with it." One reason they were able to get away with it for so long was that the British police refused to investigate the extent of the potential criminal activity. Why were they reluctant? According to one person who found himself the victim of illicit surveillance, the answer is clear: "What happened was that the News of the World or News International more generally managed to get its filthy, slimy tentacles in every nook and cranny of the Metropolitan police and to all intents and purpose that corrupted it." As the British parliament prepares to reopen its hearings, one question resonates throughout the News empire: how far up the corporate ladder did the knowledge and approval to pay for these services go?
 
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Audience level: 0.71 (from 0.30 for Fantasy ... to 1.00 for Four Corne ...)

The terrorist hunters
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Alternative Names
Andy Hayman police officer

Andy Hayman politieagent

Languages