WorldCat Identities

Boon, Sonja 1969-

Overview
Works: 16 works in 53 publications in 1 language and 1,421 library holdings
Genres: Biographies  History  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Creator, htt
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Sonja Boon
 
Most widely held works by Sonja Boon
Telling the flesh : life writing, citizenship, and the body in the letters to Samuel Auguste Tissot by Sonja Boon( )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 831 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book is about the stories our bodies tell, the stories we tell about our bodies and the ways that we integrate such stories into broader political narratives about citizenship and belonging. The stories under examination are those of the individuals who wrote letters describing their bodily sufferings to Swiss physician Samuel Auguste Tissot (1728-1797), the most famous doctor in Enlightenment Europe. Consultation by correspondence enabled individuals in far-flung places to maintain contact with leading physicians and was a mainstay of the eighteenth-century medical encounter. And it did something more: it gave individuals the opportunity to conceive their psychic and somatic sufferings in textual form. Through the process of writing letters describing their ailments, the authors of these letters created textual selves, articulating bodily autobiographies and identities shaped by bodily experience. The letters to Samuel Tissot are thus not only articulations of bodily suffering, but are articulations of bodily selves. Experienced within the social, cultural and political contexts of mid-eighteenth-century Europe, they tell us how individuals understood their bodily selves in relation to broader political discourses of belonging and citizenship. What people did with their bodies mattered in a political environment beset by concerns about depopulation, moral depravity, and corporeal excess, and organized around intricate rules of propriety. For many Enlightenment thinkers, the body functioned as a vital stage for the performance of virtue. Embodied virtue (ie. virtue enacted through bodily actions and behaviours), created the conditions of what Boon terms "corporeal citizenship"."--Provided by publisher
Autoethnography and feminist theory at the water's edge : unsettled islands by Sonja Boon( )

15 editions published between 2018 and 2019 in English and held by 231 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book takes an intimate, collaborative, interdisciplinary autoethnographic approach that both emphasizes the authors' entangled relationships with the more-than-human, and understands the land and sea-scapes of Newfoundland as integral to their thinking, theorizing, and writing. The authors draw on feminist, trans, queer, critical race, Indigenous, decolonial, and posthuman theories in order to examine the relationships between origins, memories, place, identities, bodies, pasts, and futures. The chapters address a range of concerns, among them love, memory, weather, bodies, vulnerability, fog, myth, ice, desire, hauntings, and home. Autoethnography and Feminist Theory at the Water's Edge will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines including gender studies, cultural geography, folklore, and anthropology, as well as those working in autoethnography, life writing, and island studies.
The life of Madame Necker : sin, redemption and the Parisian salon by Sonja Boon( Book )

10 editions published between 2011 and 2016 in English and held by 199 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Suzanne Curchod Necker was one of the most influential women of her day: hostess to a brilliant literary salon, wife of Jacques Necker, the politically powerful pre-revolutionary French finance minister, and mother to the great Romantic writer Germaine de Staël. Madame Necker occupies a unique position in French social and cultural history, but, dwarfed by the posthumous legacies of her husband and daughter, the last biographical study of her was over sixty years ago. This study breaks new ground by examining the profoundly corporeal nature of Madame Necker's life--her debilitating, decades-long psychic and somatic suffering and subsequent premature death and curious burial. Interdisciplinary in scope, but unified by its emphasis on the body as cultural construct and lived experience, this archivally based work is informed by theoretical engagement with feminist theories of the body, performance studies and theories of auto/biography."--Page 4 of cover
Autoethnography and Feminist Theory at the Water's Edge : Unsettled Islands by Sonja Boon( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Staging the improper body : Suzanne Curchod Necker (1737-1794) and the stigmatization of the self by Sonja Boon( Book )

4 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This dissertation explores the life and writings of the eighteenth-century Parisian salonniere, Suzanne Curchod Necker (1737-1794), from the perspective of corporeal autobiography. In it, I posit the body as a stage upon which identity can be displayed and argue for an understanding of the body as an agentive entity which has the capacity to take an active role in the construction and presentation of the autobiographical self. My work, which analyzes Madame Necker's published and unpublished writings, is mainly concerned with identifying corporeal contradictions; that is, in understanding manifestations of corporeal impropriety as loci for the performance and presentation of self. Looking at the performance of illness in particular, this work suggests that physical suffering functions as a barometer for an individual's psychic perceptions and can be consciously deployed as a strategy for managing social, religious, and cultural exile. My work identifies four interlocking themes in Madame Necker's life: sociability, religion, illness, and the reproductive body, and seeks to assess the relationships, intersections, and tensions between them, particularly as they emerged in the form of embodied practices. I suggest that the contradictions between the sociable body (as represented by the irreligious mondanite of the French elite) and the Calvinist body (understood through Madame Necker's moral stance) played themselves out in the maternal body, which functioned not only as the site for the realization of true virtue and happiness, but also as the locus of human weakness. The tensions and contradictions between sociable, Calvinist, and maternal bodies converged in the sick body, an entity marked by psychic and somatic suffering which was finally memorialized-in the form of the embalmed cadaver-as the divine body. Ultimately, I argue that the externally-visible corporeal sufferings of Madame Necker's sick body might be conceived as a highly theatrical instance of narcissistic display, evidence of a ritualistic understanding of the symbolic power of the corporeal as a prime site for the performance of abjection and the longing for absolution
Solos for a flute and a bass by François Devienne( Recording )

1 edition published in 2003 and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dead woman Pickney : a memoir of childhood in Jamaica by Yvonne Shorter Brown( Book )

2 editions published in 2022 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Dead Woman Pickney chronicles Yvonne Shorter Brown’s life growing up in Jamaica between 1943 and 1965 and teaching in Canada from 1969. Told with stridency and humour, the stories include both personal experience and history. Taking up the haunting memories of childhood, along with persistent racial marginalization of Black people, both globally and in Canada, the author sets out to construct a narrative that at once explains her own origins in the former slave society of Jamaica and traces the outsider status of Africa and its peoples. The author’s quest to understand the absence of her mother and her mother’s people from her life is at the heart of the narrative. The author struggles through life to discover the identity of her mother in the face of silence from her father’s brutal family. In this updated edition she adds a coda, “finding mother”, constructed from archives, genealogy, letters, and journals. Initially published in 2010, this second edition includes expanded text and a foreword by Sonja Boon, author of What the Oceans Remember."--
Re-imagining the Guyanas = Les Guyanes réimaginées by Lawrence Aje( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

French Guyane, Guyana and Suriname are not often focused on. Sometimes French Guyane is believed to be an island, and one often wonders where Guyana is situated, or Suriname. This collection of essays aims to increase the visibility of the Guyanas and more particularly of the three countries mentioned above. It also means to contribute to scholarship already published and share the knowledge across various disciplinary fields. It will question the traditional divide between disciplines as the best way to approach such complex territories that contain many geographies, histories, languages and cultures. Moving away from simplistic and binary perspectives, the contributors of the volume address these questions that revisit colonial and postcolonial identities, and the porosity between their borders. What can the Guyanas do for us and what can we do for them? Creative and academic writers such as Gaiutra Bahadur, Sonja Boon, Janette Bulkan, Juanita Cox, Tim Cribb, Cyril Dabydeen, Charles Forsdick, Lisa Katharina Grund, Kathleen Gyssels, Natalie Hopkinson, Ateeka Khan, Sinah Kloß, Michael Mitchell, Gabriel Cambraia Neiva, Clem Seecharan, Janice Lowe Shinebourne, explore their Guyanas and others'. La Guyane française, le Guyana et le Suriname ne sont pas souvent au centre des intérêts de tout un chacun. Parfois la Guyane française est prise pour une île et on se demande souvent où sont situés le Guyana ou le Suriname. Les essais réunis dans ce volume ont pour but d'augmenter la visibilité des Guyanes, et plus particulièrement des trois pays mentionnés. L'intention est aussi d'enrichir la recherche déjà publiée et de partager les connaissances de façon interdisciplinaire. Ce volume s'efforcera de mettre en question la division traditionnelle entre les champs universitaires : une telle division est-elle le meilleur moyen d'approcher des territoires si complexes, aux géographies, histoires, langues et cultures si multiples ? S'éloignant d'une approche binaire qui serait
The Life of Madame Necker: Sin, Redemption and the Parisian Salon (Body, Gender and Culture) by Sonja Boon( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mothers and others : the politics of lactation in medical consultation letters addressed to Samuel-Auguste Tissot by Sonja Boon( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

What the Oceans Remember : Searching for Belonging and Home by Sonja Boon( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Author Sonja Boon’s heritage is complicated. Although she has lived in Canada for more than thirty years, she was born in the UK to a Surinamese mother and a Dutch father. Boon’s family history spans five continents: Europe, Africa, Southeast Asia, South America, and North America. Despite her complex and multi-layered background, she has often omitted her full heritage, replying “I’m Dutch-Canadian” to anyone who asks about her identity. An invitation to join a family tree project inspired a journey to the heart of the histories that have shaped her identity. It was an opportunity to answer the two questions that have dogged her over the years: Where does she belong? And who does she belong to? Boon’s archival research—in Suriname, the Netherlands, the UK, and Canada—brings her opportunities to reflect on the possibilities and limitations of the archives themselves, the tangliness of oceanic migration, histories, the meaning of legacy, music, love, freedom, memory, ruin, and imagination. Ultimately, she reflected on the relevance of our past to understanding our present. Deeply informed by archival research and current scholarship, but written as a reflective and intimate memoir, What the Oceans Remember addresses current issues in migration, identity, belonging, and history through an interrogation of race, ethnicity, gender, archives and memory. More importantly, it addresses the relevance of our past to understanding our present. It shows the multiplicity of identities and origins that can shape the way we understand our histories and our own selves
“I did not mean to make away with the child, I did not know what I was about”: Autobiographical Traces of Infanticide in Eighteenth-Century Trial Records by Sonja Boon( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this essay, I am interested in the possibilities of maternal autobiography in court documents. I focus specifically on the trial records of mothers charged with infanticide between 1700 and 1800. Drawing on the Proceedings of the Old Bailey, 1674-1913, I consider these narratives both through the lenses of legal and social histories of infanticide, and in relation to Marlene Kadar et al.’s notion of “autobiographical traces,” fragmentary stories that emerge when pieces of individual lives are stitched together with the historical, social and political context in which they emerged. The fragments I explore in this essay include not only the limited textual interventions of the accused mothers themselves, as they took the stand to speak in their defense, but also their silences and erasures. In addition to this, I consider the autobiographical potential of these women’s actions and behaviours, as witnessed and deposed by those called to the stand. Finally, I consider the stories of self that emerge from the reproductive and maternal body; that is, I am interested in the ways that bodily stories and understandings inevitably complicate textual and behavioural narratives.  This article was submitted to the European Journal of Life Writing on 15 September 2014 and published on 25 June 2015
Rewriting Rousseau's mom : the Parisian salonnière and the maternal imaginary in pre-revolutionary France by Sonja Boon( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

What the oceans remember : searching for belonging and home by Sonja Boon( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"It's a memoir that traverses five continents and spans two centuries. Author Boon explores archives, family stories, and her own memories in a search for origins, belonging, and home. Her journey is interwoven with reflections on the meaning of music, love, legacy, freedom, memory, ruin, and the relevance of our past to understanding our present."--
What the Oceans Remember : Searching for Belonging and Home by Sonja Boon( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Author Sonja Boon’s heritage is complicated. Although she has lived in Canada for more than thirty years, she was born in the UK to a Surinamese mother and a Dutch father. Boon’s family history spans five continents: Europe, Africa, Southeast Asia, South America, and North America. Despite her complex and multi-layered background, she has often omitted her full heritage, replying “I’m Dutch-Canadian” to anyone who asks about her identity. An invitation to join a family tree project inspired a journey to the heart of the histories that have shaped her identity. It was an opportunity to answer the two questions that have dogged her over the years: Where does she belong? And who does she belong to? Boon’s archival research—in Suriname, the Netherlands, the UK, and Canada—brings her opportunities to reflect on the possibilities and limitations of the archives themselves, the tangliness of oceanic migration, histories, the meaning of legacy, music, love, freedom, memory, ruin, and imagination. Ultimately, she reflected on the relevance of our past to understanding our present. Deeply informed by archival research and current scholarship, but written as a reflective and intimate memoir, What the Oceans Remember addresses current issues in migration, identity, belonging, and history through an interrogation of race, ethnicity, gender, archives and memory. More importantly, it addresses the relevance of our past to understanding our present. It shows the multiplicity of identities and origins that can shape the way we understand our histories and our own selves
 
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Telling the flesh : life writing, citizenship, and the body in the letters to Samuel Auguste Tissot
Covers
Autoethnography and feminist theory at the water's edge : unsettled islandsThe life of Madame Necker : sin, redemption and the Parisian salon
Alternative Names
Boon, Sonja, 1969-

Languages
English (52)