WorldCat Identities

Chou, Doris

Overview
Works: 22 works in 23 publications in 1 language and 130 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Treaties 
Roles: Other, Contributor, Author
Classifications: RG530, 618.3
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Doris Chou
WHO guidelines on the management of health complications from female genital mutilation by Karin Stein( )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 93 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Female genital mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures that involve the partial or total removal of external genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. The procedure has no known health benefits. Moreover, the removal of or damage to healthy genital tissue interferes with the natural functioning of the body and may cause several immediate and long-term health consequences. Girls and women who have undergone FGM are therefore at risk of suffering from its complications throughout their lives. In addition, FGM violates a series of well-established human rights principles, including the principles of equality and non-discrimination on the basis of sex, the right to life when the procedure results in death, and the right to freedom from torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, as well as the rights of the child. These guidelines are intended primarily for health-care professionals involved in the care of girls and women who have been subjected to any form of female genital mutilation (FGM). This document also provides guidance for policy-makers, health-care managers and others in charge of planning, developing and implementing national and local health-care protocols and policies. The information contained in this document will also be useful for designing job aids and pre- and in-service professional training curricula in the areas of medicine, nursing, midwifery and public health for health-care providers caring for girls and women living with FGM
Trends in maternal mortality, 1990 to 2008 : estimates( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents the global, regional, and country estimates of maternal mortality in 2008, and the findings of the assessment of trends of maternal mortality levels since 1990. It summarizes the challenges involved in measuring maternal mortality and the main approaches to measurement, and explains the methodology of the 2008 maternal mortality estimates. The final section discusses the use and limitations of the estimates, with an emphasis on the importance of improved data quality for estimating maternal mortality. The appendices present the sources of data for the country estimates as well as Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) estimates for the different regional groupings for World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Bank, and United Nations Population Division (UNPD)
Ending preventable maternal mortality: phase II of a multi-step process to develop a monitoring framework, 2016-2030 by R. Rima Jolivet( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Adolescent first births in East Africa: disaggregating characteristics, trends and determinants by Sarah E Neal( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Maternal morbidity measurement tool pilot: study protocol by Lale Say( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Framing maternal morbidity: WHO scoping exercise by Rachel C Vanderkruik( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Constructing maternal morbidity - towards a standard tool to measure and monitor maternal health beyond mortality by On behalf of the Maternal Morbidity Working Group( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Born Too Soon: The global epidemiology of 15 million preterm births by Born Too Soon Preterm Birth Action Group (see acknowledgement for full list)( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A common monitoring framework for ending preventable maternal mortality, 2015-2030: phase I of a multi-step process by Allisyn C Moran( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sexual life and dysfunction after maternal morbidity: a systematic review by On behalf of the Brazilian COMMAG Study Group and the WHO Maternal Morbidity Working Group( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

eRegistries: Electronic registries for maternal and child health by J. Frederik Frøen( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gender equality and human rights approaches to female genital mutilation: a review of international human rights norms and standards by Rajat Khosla( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

ERegistries: indicators for the WHO Essential Interventions for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health by Vicki Flenady( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The global prevalence of postpartum psychosis: a systematic review by On behalf of the Maternal Morbidity Working Group( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Diversity and divergence: the dynamic burden of poor maternal health( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Maternal health is a big issue and is central to sustainable development. Each year, about 210 million women become pregnant and about 140 million newborn babies are delivered--the sheer scale of maternal health alone makes maternal well being and survival vital concerns. In this Series paper, we adopt primarily a numerical lens to illuminate patterns and trends in outcomes, but recognise that understanding of poor maternal health also warrants other perspectives, such as human rights. Our use of the best available evidence highlights the dynamic burden of maternal health problems. Increased diversity in the magnitude and causes of maternal mortality and morbidity between and within populations presents a major challenge to policies and programmes aiming to match varying needs with diverse types of care across different settings. This diversity, in turn, contributes to a widening gap or differences in levels of maternal mortality, seen most acutely in vulnerable populations, predominantly in sub-Saharan Africa. Strong political and technical commitment to improve equity-sensitive information systems is required to monitor the gap in maternal mortality, and robust research is needed to elucidate major interactions between the broad range of health problems. Diversity and divergence are defining characteristics of poor maternal health in the 21st century. Progress on this issue will be an ultimate judge of sustainable development
Global, regional, and national levels and trends in maternal mortality between 1990 and 2015, with scenario-based projections to 2030: a systematic analysis by the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Millennium Development Goal 5 calls for a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) between 1990 and 2015. We estimated levels and trends in maternal mortality for 183 countries to assess progress made. Based on MMR estimates for 2015, we constructed projections to show the requirements for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of less than 70 maternal deaths per 100 000 livebirths globally by 2030. Methods: We updated the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group (MMEIG) database with more than 200 additional records (vital statistics from civil registration systems, surveys, studies, or reports). We generated estimates of maternal mortality and related indicators with 80% uncertainty intervals (UIs) using a Bayesian model. The model combines the rate of change implied by a multilevel regression model with a time-series model to capture data-driven changes in country-specific MMRs, and includes a data model to adjust for systematic and random errors associated with different data sources. Results: We had data for 171 of 183 countries. The global MMR fell from 385 deaths per 100 000 livebirths (80% UI 359-427) in 1990, to 216 (207-249) in 2015, corresponding to a relative decline of 43·9% (34·0-48·7), with 303 000 (291 000-349 000) maternal deaths worldwide in 2015. Regional progress in reducing the MMR since 1990 ranged from an annual rate of reduction of 1·8% (0·0-3·1) in the Caribbean to 5·0% (4·0-6·0) in eastern Asia. Regional MMRs for 2015 ranged from 12 deaths per 100 000 livebirths (11-14) for high-income regions to 546 (511-652) for sub-Saharan Africa. Accelerated progress will be needed to achieve the SDG goal; countries will need to reduce their MMRs at an annual rate of reduction of at least 7·5%. Interpretation: Despite global progress in reducing maternal mortality, immediate action is needed to meet the ambitious SDG 2030 target, and ultimately eliminate preventable maternal mortality. Although the rates of reduction that are needed to achieve country-specific SDG targets are ambitious for most high mortality countries, countries that made a concerted effort to reduce maternal mortality between 2000 and 2010 provide inspiration and guidance on how to accomplish the acceleration necessary to substantially reduce preventable maternal deaths. Funding: National University of Singapore, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, USAID, and the UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction
Revising the WHO verbal autopsy instrument to facilitate routine cause-of-death monitoring by Jordana Leitao( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

OBJECTIVE: Verbal autopsy (VA) is a systematic approach for determining causes of death (CoD) in populations without routine medical certification. It has mainly been used in research contexts and involved relatively lengthy interviews. Our objective here is to describe the process used to shorten, simplify, and standardise the VA process to make it feasible for application on a larger scale such as in routine civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) systems. METHODS: A literature review of existing VA instruments was undertaken. The World Health Organization (WHO) then facilitated an international consultation process to review experiences with existing VA instruments, including those from WHO, the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and their Health in Developing Countries (INDEPTH) Network, InterVA, and the Population Health Metrics Research Consortium (PHMRC). In an expert meeting, consideration was given to formulating a workable VA CoD list [with mapping to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) CoD] and to the viability and utility of existing VA interview questions, with a view to undertaking systematic simplification. FINDINGS: A revised VA CoD list was compiled enabling mapping of all ICD-10 CoD onto 62 VA cause categories, chosen on the grounds of public health significance as well as potential for ascertainment from VA. A set of 221 indicators for inclusion in the revised VA instrument was developed on the basis of accumulated experience, with appropriate skip patterns for various population sub-groups. The duration of a VA interview was reduced by about 40% with this new approach. CONCLUSIONS: The revised VA instrument resulting from this consultation process is presented here as a means of making it available for widespread use and evaluation. It is envisaged that this will be used in conjunction with automated models for assigning CoD from VA data, rather than involving physicians
Generation and characterization of an antibody against the 30-36kDa proteins of the pupal-specific secretions of the Verson's glands in Manduca sexta by Doris Chou( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Setting maternal mortality targets for the SDGs( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Countdown to 2030: tracking progress towards universal coverage for reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Building upon the successes of Countdown to 2015, Countdown to 2030 aims to support the monitoring and measurement of women's, children's, and adolescents' health in the 81 countries that account for 95% of maternal and 90% of all child deaths worldwide. To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, the rate of decline in prevalence of maternal and child mortality, stillbirths, and stunting among children younger than 5 years of age needs to accelerate considerably compared with progress since 2000. Such accelerations are only possible with a rapid scale-up of effective interventions to all population groups within countries (particularly in countries with the highest mortality and in those affected by conflict), supported by improvements in underlying socioeconomic conditions, including women's empowerment. Three main conclusions emerge from our analysis of intervention coverage, equity, and drivers of reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH) in the 81 Countdown countries. First, even though strong progress was made in the coverage of many essential RMNCH interventions during the past decade, many countries are still a long way from universal coverage for most essential interventions. Furthermore, a growing body of evidence suggests that available services in many countries are of poor quality, limiting the potential effect on RMNCH outcomes. Second, within-country inequalities in intervention coverage are reducing in most countries (and are now almost non-existent in a few countries), but the pace is too slow. Third, health-sector (eg, weak country health systems) and non-health-sector drivers (eg, conflict settings) are major impediments to delivering high-quality services to all populations. Although more data for RMNCH interventions are available now, major data gaps still preclude the use of evidence to drive decision making and accountability. Countdown to 2030 is investing in improvements in measurement in several areas, such as quality of care and effective coverage, nutrition programmes, adolescent health, early childhood development, and evidence for conflict settings, and is prioritising its regional networks to enhance local analytic capacity and evidence for RMNCH
 
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Languages
English (21)