WorldCat Identities

Council of the Great City Schools, Washington, DC

Overview
Works: 100 works in 133 publications in 1 language and 192 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Conference papers and proceedings 
Classifications: LC5115, 371.26
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Washington, DC Council of the Great City Schools
Beating the Odds A City-By-City Analysis of Student Performance and Achievement Gaps on State Assessments. Results from the 2001-2002 School Year by Michael D Casserly( Book )

7 editions published between 2001 and 2006 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report investigates how inner-city schools are performing on the academic goals and standards set by the states for children, examining district-by-district achievement data in math and reading through spring 2002. It also measures achievement gaps between cities and states, African American and Whites, and Hispanics and Whites; presents new data on language proficiency, disability, and income; and discusses progress. Data come from 59 major city school systems. Results indicate that overall, the Great City Schools are making significant gains in math scores on state assessments, there are new gains in reading, and gaps may be narrowing. More urban school districts showed math and reading gains in 2002 than in 2000. However, urban school math and reading achievement remain below national averages. Three factors that shape the urban context include: the nation cannot meet the broad goals of No Child Left Behind and raise achievement nationally without examining the significant percentage of students enrolled in urban schools; students in urban schools are more likely than other students to be African American, Hispanic American, or Asian American, to come from low income families, and to come from non-English speaking homes; and urban schools often lack adequate financial resources. (SM)
Raising Student Achievement in the Dayton Public Schools. Report of the Dayton Public Schools Strategic Support Teams by Washington, Dc Council of the Great City Schools( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes the Dayton Public Schools Strategic Support Teams (SSTs), which address stagnant student achievement among Dayton's students. They are composed of superintendents and other senior urban school managers from across the country who have struggled with the same issues as Dayton. Chapter 1 summarizes sst findings about challenges and issues in Dayton and key proposals addressing these issues. Chapter 2 discusses leadership critical to carrying out all the proposals. Chapters 3, 4, 5, and 6, summarize issues, findings, and recommendations concerning student achievement, finance, school facilities, and district communications with the public. Chapter 7 summarizes the report. The SSTs found that the main reason for Dayton's stagnating student achievement was lack of focus. They also noted a lack of accountability. Recommendations for change include leadership focused on instruction, re-establishment of challenging academic goals, sharpening of the district's instructional program, rearrangement of how and where the district spends resources, and creation of a construction bond to allow for repair, renovation, and replacement of aging buildings. Five appendices present individuals interviewed, documents reviewed, biographic sketches of project team members, statistical comparison of the Dayton Public Schools, and information about the organizations. (Contains 9 graphs and 12 tables.) (Sm)
Assessing English Language Learners in the Great City Schools by Beth Antunez( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document attempts to clarify the issues surrounding the assessment of English language learners (ELLs) for school board members, administrators, teachers, parents, and community members in school districts that are members of the Council of the Great City Schools. These school districts enroll more than 30% of all ELLs in the United States. The report is the result of meetings of the bilingual education directors of the Council and the organization's Task Force on Bilingual Immigrant and Refugee Education. The document serves as a reference to the provisions of the federal No Child Left Behind Act that pertain to the assessment of ELLs. It provides profiles of available English language proficiency assessments, and provides information on native language assessment and accommodations available for ELLs taking the academic achievement tests in English. The report also summarizes current concerns about the validity and reliability of current ell assessments. Recommendations are made for test developers, teachers, researchers, policymakers, state education agencies, and local education agencies. An appendix describes the Council of the Great City Schools. (Contains 3 tables and 10 references.) (Sld)
Making the Grade A Report on SAT I Results in the Nation's Urban Schools by Caroline Eisner( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the first comprehensive study to examine sat I Math and Verbal test results for the nation's urban schools. This report, prepared in collaboration with The College Board, examines 1998-99 sat I Math and Verbal test results in 58 Great City Schools (gcs) districts, analyzing test scores on: number of test-takers; race/ethnicity and gender; percentage of test-takers with core or more academic preparation; mean Math and Verbal Scores; mean scores by academic preparation, gender, and household income; mean scores of African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Whites; and achievement gaps by academic preparation, gender, race/ethnicity, and household income. About 1 million exams were administered nationally during 1998-99, with 10 percent of all test-takers nationally from the gcs. Test-takers nationally were more likely to be white. Gcs test-takers were more likely to be African American or Hispanic. In both settings, females outnumbered males, and males had higher sat I Math and Verbal scores. Average sat I Verbal and Math scores nationally were about 10 percent higher than gcs scores. Overall, White students had the highest scores, and African American students had the lowest scores, in both settings. Six out of ten test-takers in both settings had taken core or more academic coursework. Average sat scores increased as household incomes increased nationally and in the gcs. Document includes 2 tables and 37 figures. Appendices include: (1) Description of sat I Math and Verbal Subtests; (2) Definition of "Core" and "Less than Core" Academic Preparation; and (3) Great City School District. Sm)
National urban education goals : baseline indicators, 1990-91 by Michael D Casserly( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report sets the 1990-91 baseline from which the nation's urban public schools will measure their progress on the six National Urban Education Goals. The report contains four major chapters measuring the status of urban schools using various indicators. The first chapter presents data on the demographics of city schools and compares those urban characteristics to the nation at large. The second chapter is divided into six parts, each devoted to one of the National Urban Education Goals and each presenting data aggregated across all urban school districts for the 1990-91 school year. The third chapter presents data on various characteristics of urban public schools that might be of general interest. The fourth chapter presents data on the revenues and expenditures of urban schools, with comparisons to national averages. These chapters are followed by a chapter that describes data strengths and limitation, summary of future plans, keyed to the content of the previous chapters. Finally, the report contains city-by-city profiles with data on demographics, the six goals, system characteristics, and funding. At the end are two fold-outs: the first shows aggregate data across all the Great City Schools and the second shows data on national averages. Included are 6 tables, 98 figures, and footnotes describing the tables and figures. (Jb)
Striving for Excellence A Report on Stanford Achievement Test Results in the Great City Schools by Caroline Eisner( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines urban student achievement using the SAT-9, the most commonly used standardized assessment among the major cities. The study, conducted in collaboration with the test's creator, Harcourt Educational Measurement, highlights student achievement in Great City Schools (GCS) and describes how urban students perform on traditional standardized tests. It provides a way for urban school districts to compare outcomes and is the first step of a longitudinal analysis of urban student progress. It examines the achievement of 760,000 urban test-takers in grades 2-11 on reading, language, mathematics, problem solving, and science subtests. SAT-9 data are disaggregated by race/ethnicity, gender, and poverty. Test-takers in this sample are very different from test-takers nationally. Six out of ten test-takers were African American or Hispanic in the GCS while in the national sample, six out of ten were White. Furthermore, two-thirds eligible for free lunch in the GCS sample, in contract to one-third nationally. Overall, GCS mean normal curve equivalents (NCEs) were well within the average range. White GCS test-takers outperformed all other urban test-takers and scored higher than the national NCE mean (indicating that urban schools educate students to take the high standards in some circumstances). The achievement gap by race was no worse in the GCS than it was nationally. There was no evidence to support the theory that academic achievement gets worse the longer students remain in school. Achievement gaps between White and non-White urban test-takers were significant. The greater the concentration of poverty in the school district, the lower the student achievement. Document contains 4 tables and 28 figures. Appendices include the following: (1) performance levels for GCS and the Nation. Grades 2-11; (2) Normal Curve Equivalents; (3) Performance Levels; and (4) CGCS Districts tested. (SM)
California's Proposition 227 Implications and Costs of the Unz Initiative by Washington, DC Council of the Great City Schools( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Voters in California will vote June 2, 1998 to decide the fate of Proposition 227, a measure proposed by businessman Ron Unz that would substantially change the way that students who are not proficient in English are taught. If approved by the voters, Proposition 227, the Unz Initiative, would essentially eliminate bilingual education programs in the state's public elementary and secondary schools, replacing them with special 1-year immersion classes taught in English only. This report explores how the Unz Initiative will affect the quality of public education in California, and how much it may cost the taxpayers. Approximately 1.4 million children in the state are classified as English language learners, and about half of these students currently receive academic instruction in their primary or home language as they are learning English. If the Unz Initiative is approved, numbers of students would require new class and school assignments, and sizable numbers of teachers would be reassigned, and might require recertification in subject areas other than bilingual education. New curricula would be developed, new professional development programs would be required, and ways to notify parents would have to be developed. Finally, new ways for assessing student performance in each academic area would have to be developed. These short-term effects would be followed by long-term costs. The academic harm done many students may not be felt immediately, but many students would undoubtedly fall further behind their English-speaking peers. Many may require costly compensatory education. and some may need to be in programs like Title I that are even costlier to run and harder to get out of than the current bilingual programs. Costs of retaining students in grade and providing needed summer programs would be added to costs for professional development so that regular education teachers could meet the challenges of students with inadequate English skills. The Unz Initiative would bring with it a high probability that many English language learners would end up in remedial, special education, or alternative classes. (SLD)
Beating the Odds II A City-By-City Analysis of Student Performance and Achievement Gaps on State Assessments, Spring 2001 Results by Michael D Casserly( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents district-by-district achievement data on 57 major city school systems in reading and mathematics. State assessment results were collected from state Web sites, reports, and databases. Data were analyzed by race/ethnicity when reported. Overall, the Great City Schools have made meaningful gains in math scores on state assessments, and gaps in math achievement in urban schools may be narrowing. However, urban school achievement remains below national averages in math. Reading achievement in urban schools has improved on state tests, and gaps may also be narrowing, though urban school reading achievement remains below national averages. More urban school districts showed reading and mathematics gains in 2001 than in 2000. Key factors shaping the urban context: the nation cannot raise achievement across the board without paying attention to the significant percentage of students enrolled in urban schools; students in urban schools are more likely than other students to be African American, Hispanic, or Asian, to come from low-income families, and to come from non-English speaking homes; and urban schools often lack adequate financial resources. It should be noted that this year's (2002) report (as compared to that of 2001, containing data on 55 city school systems) adds data on Austin, Memphis, and Oklahoma City; and deletes data on Tulsa--a net increase of 2 cities. (Contains 19 figures.) (Sm)
Foundations for success : case studies of how urban school systems improve student achievement by Jason C Snipes( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines the experiences of three large urban school districts (and part of a fourth) that raised academic performance for their districts as a whole, while also reducing racial differences in achievement. Educational challenges included low achievement, political conflict, inexperienced teachers, low expectations, and lack of instructional coherence. The research involved case studies of these districts and comparisons with other districts that had not yet seen similar improvements. Researchers conducted site visits to each district, interviews with key district-level actors, focus groups, teachers, and principals, as well as document reviews. Results indicated that political and organizational stability over a prolonged period and consensus on educational reform strategies were necessary prerequisites to meaningful change. Districts faced systemic challenges above the individual school level. They lacked clarity regarding instructional standards and had a wide variety of educational strategies and instructional approaches. To achieve instructional coherence, districts adopted or developed their own, uniform, relatively prescriptive reading and math curricula for the elementary grades. The districts used data to guide instruction and decision making. Leaders in these districts invested substantial amounts of time, effort, and resources in changing district culture and creating a systemwide consensus for reform. Appendices contain profiles of the case study and comparison districts, as well New York City's Chancellor's District. (Contains 26 references.) (SM)
A Decade of ACT Results in the Nation's Urban Schools, 1990-1999 A Report on Urban Student Achievement and Course Taking by Caroline Eisner( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report summarizes ACT assessment scores of students attending Great City Schools (GCS) between 1990-99, examining achievement gaps by course preparation, race, gender, and poverty. Data included ACT composite scores and scores in English, reading, math, and science reasoning. The total number of ACT test-takers increased nationally by 20 percent. GCS test-takers increased by 16 percent. About 71 percent of GCS test-takers were minorities, and 62 percent were female (similar to national percentages). The average ACT composite score (18.9) in the GCS did not change between 1990 and 1999; the average ACT composite score nationally increased from 20.6 to 21.0. The percentage of GCS test-takers who had taken a core academic sequence of courses increased significantly. Average ACT composite scores ranged from 17.5 percent in the most impoverished GCS districts to 20.7 percent in the least impoverished districts. Average GCS composite test scores increased among all groups except Asian Americans and Mexican Americans. Achievement gaps between White and African American GCS students were similar to national gaps. ACT content scores and composite scores differed by race/ethnicity. GCS females scored higher in English and reading, and males scored higher in math and science reasoning. The fastest improving GCS districts between 1990-99 were New York City, Pittsburgh, Mesa, St. Louis, and Anchorage. Document includes 54 figures and the following appendices: (1) Definition of "Core" and "Less than Core" Academic Preparation; (2) Number of Students Tested by GCS District; and (3) Primary Test for College Placement by GCS District. (SM)
Advancing Excellence in Urban Schools A Report on Advanced Placement Examinations in the Great City Schools by Caroline Eisner( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the first comprehensive study to examine Advanced Placement (AP) course-taking patterns and subject test results in the nation's urban schools. This study investigates both Great City Schools' (GCS) AP scores and scores for a national sample of test takers. The GCS data set includes 58 large urban public school districts. The primary purpose of this research, done in collaboration with The College Board, is to examine urban student achievement in the context of high standards. The report analyzes AP examination data on: (1) number of test-takers; (2) race/ethnicity and gender; (3) percentage of test-takers with core or more academic preparation; (4) mean scores on 12 subject tests; (5) mean scores by academic preparation and gender; (6) mean scores of African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Whites; (7) scores by household income; and (8) achievement gaps by academic preparation, gender, race/ethnicity, and household income. Data analysis examined biology, calculus AB, chemistry, English language, English literature, physics B, and U.S. history. GCS and national test-takers were more likely to be White than nonWhite. Females were more likely to take exams in subjects requiring extensive reading. Males were more likely to take exams in subjects requiring extensive mathematical skills. Mean subject test scores for GCS test takers were more likely to be below the 3.0 needed for college credit than test takers nationally, whose mean scores were slightly above 3.0. White students were most likely to outperform all other students. Mean AP subject test score differences were greater between Whites and African Americans than between Whites and Hispanics. Most test-takers had core or more academic preparation. Students with such preparation outperformed those with less preparation, though White students in GCS and nationally with less than core preparation scored better in all subjects than Hispanics and African Americans who took core courses. Household income affected AP subject test performance. Document includes 4 tables and 73 figures. Appendices include: (1) Description of Advanced Placement Subject Tests; (2) Advanced Placement Examination Scoring Levels and College Credit: (3) Definition of "Core" and "Less than Core" Academic Preparation; and (4) Great City School Districts. (SM)
Public Schools Comparison of Achievement Results for Students Attending Privately Managed and Traditional Schools in Six Cities. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives by Washington, DC Council of the Great City Schools( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the last decade, a series of educational reforms have increased opportunities for private companies to play a role in public education. For instance, school districts have sometimes looked to private companies to manage poorly performing schools. The accountability provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 may further increase such arrangements because schools that continuously fail to make adequate progress toward meeting state goals are eventually subject to fundamental restructuring by the state, which may include turning the operation of the school over to a private company. (Author)
Student performance assessment in the great city schools by Judith Hrul( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Focusing on formal testing programs involving academic achievement, the assessment of student performance in 28 large city school districts is described. In addition to presenting how districts have designed testing programs to meet the variety in the students they serve, this report also discussed test management, work with test publishers, test security, and data storage. The contents include: (1) standardized tests in use; (2) purposes of testing; (3) grade levels and skills tested; (4) selection of tests; (5) technical specifications; (6) administration of test; (7) management of test data; (8) results of testing; (9) court action on testing; (10) costs of testing; and (11) a description of each district's testing program. (Pn)
Challenges to Urban Education: Results in the Making. a Report of the Council of the Great City Schools by Richard Green( Book )

2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Without massive public intervention centering on the public schools, America will have a permanent underclass. This report of the Council of Great City Schools analyzes existing reports on educational reform and provides recommendations for improving urban schools. The report examines the following five key issues that urban schools will have to confront during the next few years: (1) educational achievement; (2) youth opportunities for enrollment in four-year postsecondary education degree programs, employment, and training; (3) community and parent involvement; (4) health care; and (5) buildings and facilities. Successful model public school programs are described, and elements they share are listed. Each of the top ten needs required to address the issues is discussed, and recommendations for meeting them are made. Appendices detail successful urban programs, describe the Council of the Great City Schools, and list the reports and statistical sources used. (Bjv)
Critical trends in urban education : fifth biennial survey of America's great city schools by Sharon Lewis( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This monograph is the third in a series of polls of the leadership of America's major public school systems. In addition to surveying board members, superintendents, and other leadership staff, this poll also included urban mayors and representatives of colleges and universities who work with staff and students of the member cities of the Council of the Great City Schools. Approximately 235 persons responded to the survey, which was administered at the annual conference of the Council of the Great City Schools. Responses are compared, as appropriate, to the surveys of 1993-94 and 1995-96. Fully 82.1% of respondents indicated that they were optimistic or somewhat optimistic about the future of urban education, but slightly more than 1 in 10 were somewhat or entirely pessimistic. When educators and urban leaders were asked to rate the overall help the school system received, no group or sector had an overwhelming majority of favorable responses, but many were acknowledged. However, less than one-sixth gave positive ratings to the print and electronic media and the U.S. Congress. As in previous surveys, parental involvement, adequate funding, and academic achievement remained the top most pressing needs. Nearly 9 of 10 respondents said that the strategies they used most for urban education reform were securing partnerships with business and community leaders and implementing staff development programs. Developing and implementing professional programs, designing and implementing higher performance standards, and designing and implementing higher content standards were the three most effective school reform strategies mentioned. The insights provided by this poll show that the categories of urban leaders sampled were fairly consistent in their responses, and that they are fairly optimistic about the prospects for urban education. (Contains seven figures, two tables, and two references.) (SLD)
Becoming the best : standards and assessment development in the Great City schools by Washington, Dc Council of the Great City Schools( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This research report is a summary of the information the Council of Great City Schools gathered in a survey of members about the development of standards and assessments in 1995. Some 77% (36) of the 47 member districts responded to the survey, which asked about the impetus for standards and assessment development, the areas in which they are being developed, and the uses to which they are being put. Twenty-eight of the responding districts are in the process of developing or adapting content standards, and 13% have completed and implemented such standards. Some 71% indicated that the development of content standards was implemented locally or at the state level. About 69% of the respondents indicated that the content standards they were working on used national or state standards as models or guidelines. Responses of 35 districts indicated that outside organizations, groups, and stakeholders were involved in the standards development process. About 84% of these districts were in the process of changing assessments to align with new standards, and about 30% expect that the new assessment systems will be closely aligned with state assessment systems. Nearly 42% of the responding districts are using performance-based assessments as part of their overall assessment systems, and about 44% believe that they will need technical assistance in developing new assessments. Five appendixes provide supplemental information on standards development at urban, state, and national levels. (Contains 2 tables, 4 figures, and 96 references grouped by topic.) (Sld)
National Urban Education Goals: 1996-97 Indicators Report. District Profiles by Washington, DC Council of the Great City Schools( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report assesses where America's Great City Schools (gcs) were on the National Urban Education goals in 1996-97 and how they compared to where they were in 1990-91. The National Urban Education Goals address the unique and pressing needs of urban schools and provide an enabling set of targets on the way toward achieving national goals. This report is the third in a series started nearly 10 years ago. It is unique from the others in that it contains only district profiles. The eight urban education goals around which this report is based are: readiness to learn; increased graduation rates; improved academic achievement; quality teachers; postsecondary opportunities; safe and caring environment; equitable and adequate funding; and increased parental involvement. The study finds that, in general, most of the nation's major urban public school systems have improved. The report presents overall findings for each of the eight urban education goals, then provides district-by-district profiles which focus on each of the eight goals, student demographics, system characteristics, and funding. A summary profile of the Great City Schools and a comparable national profile are also provided. (Sm)
Gateways to Success A Report on Urban Student Achievement and Course-Taking by Inc., Iowa City, IA ACT( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines the effects of high school courses on students' readiness for college-level work. ACT Assessment scores for 1998 for graduates of Council of the Great City Schools member high schools are compared with those for 1997 graduates and with students nationally. All data are analyzed by course-taking patterns, school district wealth, student ethnicity, and gender. The report also examines the gap between urban students' readiness for college and their college expectations. Findings support the view that every urban student considering attending college should take a program of college preparatory courses, including 4 years of English, 3 or more years of mathematics, 3 or more years of social studies, and 3 or more years of science. The racial and ethnic composition of ACT urban test takers continues to be quite different from test takers nationally; three-fourths of urban test takers were children of color. Urban students increased their average ACT composite score between 1997 and 1998, although the national average remained unchanged. Of the 52 Great City Schools studied, only 15% (8 districts) had 1998 average ACT composite scores at or above the national average. These findings and other data from the study suggest the importance of taking courses that are rigorous enough to prepare a student for high school and preclude the need for remedial coursework after high school. Recommendations and promising practices are suggested to improve the academic achievement and college success rate of urban students. Appendixes define core courses, present standards for transition, and list numbers of ACT-tested graduates by Great City Schools district. (Contains 26 figures.) (SLD)
Great Cities Research Intern Training Program. Final Report by Washington, Dc Council of the Great City Schools( Book )

1 edition published in 1971 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document describes and presents the results of a project whose general purpose was to field test a set of activities that could upgrade the quality and effectiveness of research and evaluation activities in large urban school districts. Three aspects of this problem were addressed: The need for better conceptual models for evaluation in the school setting; the need for specially-trained, entry-level personnel for school research divisions; and the need for expanding the knowledge and skills of existing staff. The document concludes with a summary of the success of the project and with recommendations regarding evaluation problems in large urban school districts. The appendixes include overviews and outlines of various courses in the training program, the agenda of various training sessions, suggestions for improvement in the courses, and a selected bibliography for a course on classroom research. (Author/DN)
Caring schools, caring communities : an urban blueprint for comprehensive school health and safety by Nancy Kober( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report synthesizes the presentations and discussions from a 1993 symposium on comprehensive school health and safety into a blueprint for urban action. The first part of the report summarizes the nature of health and safety problems in urban schools and discusses some of the barriers that hinder integrated solutions. The second part describes some model programs highlighted during the symposium because of the comprehensive strategies they employ to address poor health, youth violence, or both. The third part lays out a working definition of a comprehensive school health and safety effort and its components. Essential elements of the blueprint include: (1) locally developed solutions, (2) community involvement and support, (3) interagency collaboration, (4) public education and awareness, (5) effective administrative structures, (6) true integration of activities, (7) a supportive school environment, (8) school-based services, (9) funding and resources, and (10) Federal support. (SLD)
 
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