WorldCat Identities

Carneiro, Pedro

Overview
Works: 37 works in 41 publications in 2 languages and 86 library holdings
Genres: Interviews 
Roles: Author, Performer, Instrumentalist, Narrator, Speaker, Author of introduction
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Pedro Carneiro
Mandated Benefits, Employment, And Inequality In A Dual Economy by Almeida( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Enforcement Of Labor Regulation, Informal Labor, And Firm Performance by Almeida( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Enforcement of Labor Regulation and Firm Size by Rita Almeida( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper investigates how the enforcement of labor regulation affects firm size and other firm characteristics in Brazil. We explore firm level data on employment, capital, and output, city level data on economic characteristics, and new administrative data measuring enforcement of regulation at the city level. Since enforcement may be endogenous, we instrument this variable with the distance between the city where the firm is located and surrounding enforcement offices, while controlling for a rich set of city characteristics (such as past levels of informality in the city). We present suggestive evidence of the validity of this instrument. We find that stricter enforcement of labor regulation constrains firm size, and leads to higher unemployment
PSATHAS : View from Olympus( )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Estimating Marginal Returns to Education. Nber Working Paper No. 16474 by Pedro Carneiro( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper estimates the marginal returns to college for individuals induced to enroll in college by different marginal policy changes. The recent instrumental variables literature seeks to estimate this parameter, but in general it does so only under strong assumptions that are tested and found wanting. We show how to utilize economic theory and local instrumental variables estimators to estimate the effect of marginal policy changes. Our empirical analysis shows that returns are higher for individuals with values of unobservables that make them more likely to attend college. We contrast the returns to well-defined marginal policy changes with iv estimates of the return to schooling. Some marginal policy changes inducing students into college produce very low returns
CARNEIRO, P.( )

in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Le conseguenze a lungo termine delle competenze cognitive e non cognitive apprese nei primi anni di vita( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in Italian and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oliveira, J.P.: Spiral Of Light( )

in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Equality of opportunity and educational achievement in Portugal by Pedro Carneiro( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Removing the veil of ignorance in assessing the distributional impacts of social policies by Pedro Carneiro( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Psappha Rebonds A & B by Iannis Xenakis( Recording )

1 edition published in 2004 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Tipping point (2010) ; composition for bass clarinet, percussion, marimba, piano, and interactive-electronics by Scott Miller( Recording )

1 edition published in 2011 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Impact of Early Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills on LaterOutcomes. Cee Dp 92 by Pedro Carneiro( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

When describing the determinants of economic or social outcomes, economists often have a very simplified view of skill. Failure to take into account the fact that skill is intrinsically a multidimensional object may misguide both research and the design of social policy. In this paper, the authors analyse the consequences and determinants of cognitive and noncognitive (social) skills at age 11, using data for Great Britain from the National Child Development Survey (ncds). The authors document the importance of these skills for schooling attainment, labour market outcomes and social behaviours at various ages, and analyse the role of family background and the home learning environment in the formation of these skills. The authors find that an overall measure of non-cognitive skill is important for a host of outcomes, including whether or not an individual stays on at school beyond the age of 16, whether they have obtained a degree by age 42, employment status at age 42, work experience between ages 23 and 42, wages at age 42, smoking at age 16, truancy before age 16, exclusion from school, teenage pregnancy, involvement with crime (ages 16 and 42), and health at age 42. Furthermore, the impact of this measure of non-cognitive skill does not differ in any systematic way across particular subgroups of interest (including those defined according to parental education, or father's socioeconomic status). The authors go on to split this measure of non-cognitive skill into twelve different domains. As an example, the authors find that "inconsequential behaviour" at age 11 (for example, misbehaviour in class) is associated with a reduction in the probability that an individual will stay on at school beyond age 16, a reduction in their wages at age 42, an increase in the likelihood that they will be a heavy smoker at age 16, and an increase in the probability that they will have played truant or been involved in crime by age 16. Further, the authors find that depression at age 11 is associated with a reduction in the probability that an individual will have obtained a degree by age 42, an increase in the probability that the individual will be a heavy smoker at age 16, an increase in the likelihood that they will have been excluded from school, and an increase in the probability that they will report symptoms of depression at age 42. These findings together make it clear that a vision of the world in which skill is thought of as a one-dimensional object is extremely inadequate. Further, the authors show that both cognitive and non-cognitive skills are strongly dependent on family background and other characteristics of the home learning environment, and that this is likely to be for both genetic and environmental reasons. More importantly, their work suggests that social skills may be more malleable than cognitive skills, which--if true--suggests that there may be greater scope for education policy to affect social skills rather than cognitive skills. Appended are: (1) Data; (2) Impact of family background controls; and (3) Differences between subgroups of interest. (Contains 22 tables, 8 figures and 72 footnotes.)
Removing the veil of ignorance in assessing the distributional impacts of social policies by Pedro CARNEIRO( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Trends in quality-adjusted skill premia in the United States, 1960 - 2000 by Pedro Carneiro( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This paper presents new evidence that increases in college enrollment lead to a decline in the average quality of college graduates between 1960 and 2000, resulting in a decrease of 8 percentage points in the college premium. The standard demand and supply framework (Katz and Murphy, 1992, Card and Lemieux, 2001) can qualitatively account for the trend in the college and age premia over this period, but the quantitative adjustments that need to be made to account for changes in quality are substantial. Furthermore, the standard interpretation of the supply effect can be misleading if the quality of college workers is not controlled for. To illustrate the importance of these adjustments, we reanalyze the problem studied in Card and Lemieux (2001), who observe that the rise in the college premium in the 1980s occurred mainly for young workers, and attribute this to the differential behavior of the supply of skill between the young and the old. Our results show that changes in quality are as important as changes in prices to explain the phenomenon they document
Which skills matter? by Pedro Carneiro( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Each of us is endowed with a unique set of skills that we use in all aspects of our everyday life. Nevertheless, when describing the determinants of socio-economic outcomes -- or even the learning process - we often have a very simplified view of skill. Non-cognitive skills, such as interpersonal skills, and self-confidence, are potentially as important as cognitive skills for labour market success, and for many other aspects of life. In this paper, we analyse the determinants and consequences of both cognitive skills, and one aspect of non-cognitive skills - namely social adjustment -- at ages 7 and 11 using data for Great Britain, from the National Child Development Survey (NCDS). We document the importance of these skills for schooling attainment, labour market outcomes and social behaviours at various ages, and analyse the role of families in the formation of these skills. We find that social skills are important for a host of outcomes including schooling, social outcomes such as teenage motherhood and involvement in crime, and also for labour market outcomes. We also find that the early home environment is very important for determining social skills, whilst social skills also appear to be more malleable than cognitive skills between the ages of 7 and 11, suggesting an important role for policy. Our work contributes to a growing body of research that documents the role of non-cognitive skills in an individual?s life, all indicating that a uni-dimensional vision of skill is wrong and likely to mislead both research and policy. Our work is consistent with a growing body of evidence showing that skills formed relatively early in the life cycle have long lasting and substantial effects on a variety of important outcomes. It is quite possible that early human capital interventions, designed to take into account both the multi-dimensional nature of skills, and the dynamic nature of skill formation, can be among the most effective set of policy instruments to combat early school leaving, unemployment, teenage pregnancy, illegal behaviour and many other behaviours and outcomes
Rebonds A: pour "set" de percussions by Iannis Xenakis( Recording )

in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Making of-- by Mâkhi Xenakis( Visual )

in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The action behind the scene: all the dangerous stunts that made possible the making of these two motion pictures, "Runaway train" and "52 pick- up."
"Nrsimha" chamber music works by Akira Nishimura( Recording )

1 edition published in 2010 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Estimating distributions of potential outcomes using local instrumental variables with an application to changes in college enrollment and wage inequality by Pedro Carneiro( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This paper extends the method of local instrumental variables developed by Heckman and Vytlacil (1999, 2001, 2005) to the estimation of not only means, but also distributions of potential outcomes. The newly developed method is illustrated by applying it to changes in college enrollment and wage inequality using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1979. Increases in college enrollment cause changes in the distribution of ability among college and high school graduates. This paper estimates a semiparametric selection model of schooling and wages to show that, for fixed skill prices, a 14% increase in college participation (analogous to the increase observed in the 1980s), reduces the college premium by 12% and increases the 90-10 percentile ratio among college graduates by 2%
 
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