WorldCat Identities

Clish, Clary B.

Overview
Works: 21 works in 21 publications in 1 language and 37 library holdings
Roles: Other, Contributor
Classifications: QH345, 616.994
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Clary B Clish
A genomic and evolutionary approach reveals non-genetic drug resistance in malaria by Jonathan D Herman( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gut microbiota modulate neurobehavior through changes in brain insulin sensitivity and metabolism by Marion Soto( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Endospores and other lysis-resistant bacteria comprise a widely shared core community within the human microbiota by Sean M Kearney( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A GPX4-dependent cancer cell state underlies the clear-cell morphology and confers sensitivity to ferroptosis by Yilong Zou( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cross-sectional examination of metabolites and metabolic phenotypes in uremia by Sāḥir Kalīm( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Towards quality assurance and quality control in untargeted metabolomics studies by Richard D Beger( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Author Correction: Gut microbiome structure and metabolic activity in inflammatory bowel disease by Eric A Franzosa( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Phenotype Characterisation Using Integrated Gene Transcript, Protein and Metabolite Profiling by Matej Orešič( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The landscape of cancer cell line metabolism by Haoxin Li( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Altered exocrine function can drive adipose wasting in early pancreatic cancer by Laura V Danai( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Integration of metabolomic and transcriptomic networks in pregnant women reveals biological pathways and predictive signatures associated with preeclampsia by Rachel S Kelly( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gut microbiome structure and metabolic activity in inflammatory bowel disease by Eric A Franzosa( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Plasma branched chain/aromatic amino acids, enriched Mediterranean diet and risk of type 2 diabetes: case-cohort study within the PREDIMED Trial by Miguel Ruiz-Canela( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lysine pathway metabolites and the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the PREDIMED study: results from two case-cohort studies by Cristina Razquin( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

De novo NAD+ biosynthetic impairment in acute kidney injury in humans by Ali Poyan Mehr( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Accumulation of succinate controls activation of adipose tissue thermogenesis by Evanna L Mills( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cerebral tryptophan metabolism and outcome of tuberculous meningitis: an observational cohort study( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Immunopathology contributes to the high mortality of tuberculous meningitis, but the biological pathways involved are mostly unknown. We aimed to compare cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum metabolomes of patients with tuberculous meningitis with that of controls without tuberculous meningitis, and assess the link between metabolite concentrations and mortality. Methods: In this observational cohort study at the Hasan Sadikin Hospital (Bandung, Indonesia) we measured 425 metabolites using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in CSF and serum from 33 HIV-negative Indonesian patients with confirmed or probable tuberculous meningitis and 22 control participants with complete clinical data between March 12, 2009, and Oct 27, 2013. Associations of metabolite concentrations with survival were validated in a second cohort of 101 patients from the same centre. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism typing was used to identify tryptophan quantitative trait loci, which were used for survival analysis in a third cohort of 285 patients. Findings: Concentrations of 250 (70%) of 351 metabolites detected in CSF were higher in patients with tuberculous meningitis than in controls, especially in those who died during follow-up. Only five (1%) of the 390 metobolites detected in serum differed between patients with tuberculous meningitis and controls. CSF tryptophan concentrations showed a pattern different from most other CSF metabolites; concentrations were lower in patients who survived compared with patients who died (9-times) and to controls (31-times). The association of low CSF tryptophan with patient survival was confirmed in the validation cohort (hazard ratio 0·73; 95% CI 0·64-0·83; p<0·0001; per each halving). 11 genetic loci predictive for CSF tryptophan concentrations in tuberculous meningitis were identified (p<0·00001). These quantitative trait loci predicted survival in a third cohort of 285 HIV-negative patients in a prognostic index including age and sex, also after correction for possible confounders (p=0·0083). Interpretation: Cerebral tryptophan metabolism, which is known to affect Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth and CNS inflammation, is important for the outcome of tuberculous meningitis. CSF tryptophan concentrations in tuberculous meningitis are under strong genetic influence, probably contributing to the variable outcomes of tuberculous meningitis. Interventions targeting tryptophan metabolism could improve outcomes of tuberculous meningitis. Funding: Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences; Netherlands Foundation for Scientific Research; Radboud University; National Academy of Sciences; Ministry of Research, Technology, and Higher Education, Indonesia; European Research Council; and PEER-Health
Metabolomics of renal venous plasma from individuals with unilateral renal artery stenosis and essential hypertension( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objective: To compare the metabolite profiles of venous effluent from both kidneys of individuals with unilateral atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) in order to directly examine how impaired renal blood flow impacts small-molecule handling in humans. Methods: We applied liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolite profiling to venous plasma obtained from the stenotic (STK) and contralateral (CLK) kidneys of ARAS patients (n = 16), and both the kidneys of essential hypertensive controls (n = 11). Study samples were acquired during a 3-day protocol that included iothalamate clearance measurements, radiographic kidney phenotyping (Duplex ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography, and blood-oxygen-level-dependent MRI), and controlled sodium and caloric intake and antihypertensive treatment. Results: Partial least squares-discriminant analysis demonstrated clear separation of essential hypertensive kidney metabolite profiles versus STK and CLK metabolite profiles, but no separation between metabolite profiles of STK and CLK samples. All of the discriminating metabolites were similarly elevated in the STK and CLK samples, likely reflecting the lower glomerular filtration rate in the ARAS versus essential hypertensive individuals (mean 66.1 versus 89.2 ml/min per 1.73 m 2). In a paired analysis within the ARAS group, no metabolite was significantly altered in STK compared with CLK samples; notably, creatinine was the same in STK and CLK samples (STK/CLK ratio = 1.0, P = 0.9). Results were unchanged in an examination of ARAS patients in the bottom half of renal tissue perfusion or oxygenation. Conclusion: Metabolite profiling does not differentiate venous effluent from STKs or CLKs in individuals with unilateral ARAS, despite the measurable loss of kidney volume and blood flow on the affected side. These findings are consistent with the kidney's ability to adapt to ARAS to maintain a range of metabolic functions. Abstract : Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text
Metabolic Predictors of Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Women( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: Although metabolomic profiling offers promise for the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD), and metabolic risk factors are more strongly associated with CHD in women than men, limited data are available for women. Methods: We applied a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics platform to measure 371 metabolites in a discovery set of postmenopausal women (472 incident CHD cases, 472 controls) with validation in an independent set of postmenopausal women (312 incident CHD cases, 315 controls). Results: Eight metabolites, primarily oxidized lipids, were significantly dysregulated in cases after the adjustment for matching and CHD risk factors in both the discovery and validation data sets. One oxidized phospholipid, C34:2 hydroxy-phosphatidylcholine, remained associated with CHD after further adjustment for other validated metabolites. Subjects with C34:2 hydroxy-phosphatidylcholine levels in the highest quartile had a 4.7-fold increase in CHD odds in comparison with the lowest quartile; C34:2 hydroxy-phosphatidylcholine also significantly improved the area under the curve (P <0.01) for CHD. The C34:2 hydroxy-phosphatidylcholine findings were replicated in a third replication data set of 980 men and women (230 cardiovascular events) with a stronger association observed in women. Conclusions: These data replicate known metabolite predictors, identify novel markers, and support the relationship between lipid oxidation and subsequent CHD. Abstract : Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text
A Plasma Long-Chain Acylcarnitine Predicts Cardiovascular Mortality in Incident Dialysis Patients( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background: The marked excess in cardiovascular mortality that results from uremia remains poorly understood. Methods and Results: In 2 independent, nested case-control studies, we applied liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling to plasma obtained from participants of a large cohort of incident hemodialysis patients. First, 100 individuals who died of a cardiovascular cause within 1 year of initiating hemodialysis (cases) were randomly selected along with 100 individuals who survived for at least 1 year (controls), matched for age, sex, and race. Four highly intercorrelated long-chain acylcarnitines achieved the significance threshold adjusted for multiple testing (P <0.0003). Oleoylcarnitine, the long-chain acylcarnitine with the strongest association with cardiovascular mortality in unadjusted analysis, remained associated with 1-year cardiovascular death after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio per SD 2.3 [95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 3.8]; P =0.001). The association between oleoylcarnitine and 1-year cardiovascular death was then replicated in an independent sample (n=300, odds ratio per SD 1.4 [95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 1.9]; P =0.008). Addition of oleoylcarnitine to clinical variables improved cardiovascular risk prediction using net reclassification (NRI, 0.38 [95% confidence interval, 0.20 to 0.56]; P <0.0001). In physiologic profiling studies, we demonstrate that the fold change in plasma acylcarnitine levels from the aorta to renal vein and from pre- to post hemodialysis samples exclude renal or dialytic clearance of long-chain acylcarnitines as confounders in our analysis. Conclusions: Our data highlight clinically meaningful alterations in acylcarnitine homeostasis at the time of dialysis initiation, which may represent an early marker, effector, or both of uremic cardiovascular risk
 
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English (20)