WorldCat Identities

Degryse, P.

Overview
Works: 14 works in 14 publications in 2 languages and 18 library holdings
Genres: Case studies 
Roles: Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by P Degryse
Innovaties in de ploegenarbeid by Commission of the European Communities( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in Dutch and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Medical training therapy in lumbar syndromes by E Broll-Zeitvogel( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Glassmaking using natron from el-Barnugi (Egypt); Pliny and the Roman glass industry by Clarence Martin Jackson( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Trace element analysis in provenancing Roman glass-making by D Brems( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Isotopes on the beach, part 2: neodymium isotopic analysis for the provenancing of roman glass-making( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract In this study, we have evaluated the applicability of Nd isotopic analysis for the provenancing of Roman glass and we present a database of Nd isotopic compositions of possible sand raw materials from the western Mediterranean, as a means of comparison for the growing number of isotopic studies on ancient glass. The 143Nd/144Nd isotope ratio of sands is a good indicator for their geological (and sometimes geographical) provenance. The use of the isotopic signature of Nd as a proxy for the source of silica in glass is, however, not always straightforward because of the possible overlap of signatures from different suppliers
Isotopes on the beach, part 1: strontium isotope ratios as a provenance indicator for lime raw materials used in roman glass-making( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract The provenancing of Roman natron glass is one of the most challenging problems in the field of archaeometry. Although the use of Sr and Nd isotope ratios and trace element signatures as an indication of provenance has proven promising, there are still many unknowns. In this study, the influence of the different raw materials on the final Sr isotopic composition of Roman natron glass is examined. It is shown that the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in natron glass is significantly influenced by the silicate fraction of the sand used and does not always provide a clear indication of the lime source used
Isotopes on the beach by D Brems( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Reconstructing Regional Trajectories: the Provenance and Distribution of Archaic to Hellenistic Ceramics in Central Pisidia (South-west Turkey)( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Analytical ceramic studies offer the opportunity to determine cultural development and change on the basis of origin and use of raw materials. In this particular study, an archaeometric approach on ceramics in central Pisidia contributes to the discussion of contact and exchange between indigenous communities and several cultural spheres of influence on a long-term timescale (eighth to second centuriesbce). Morphological data as well as mineralogical (optical microscopy; n = 273) and chemical composition (by ICP-OES/MS; n = 122) of ceramics and raw materials show distinct resource zones for the production and distribution of ceramics in this connecting region of Anatolia. The use of trace element profiles (REE, HFSE, LILE and TTE) in particular is regarded as instrumental in detailing high-resolution provenancing of ceramics. The ceramic provenance indicates different patterns of material interactions during the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods. A significant increase in regional interaction occurs coinciding with the development of pottery activities at Sagalassos
New Data on the Soda Flux Used in the Production of Iznik Glazes and Byzantine Glasses( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Previous research has shown that Iznik glazes are characterized by low potash and magnesia contents. It was therefore suggested that the flux used was either a purified plant ash or some unidentified mineral source of soda. More recently, as a result of the detection of small, but significant, amounts of boron and lithium in Byzantine glasses from western Turkey, which also exhibit low potash and magnesia contents, it has been suggested that the source of the flux used was a soda-rich evaporite associated in some way with the extensive borax deposits in the region. LA-ICP-MS has been used to establish that Iznik glazes also contain similarly small amounts of boron and lithium. The Na/K, Na/Mg, Na/Ca and Na/B ratios for these Iznik glazes are shown to be comparable to the equivalent ratios calculated from published data for waters from a range of Na-HCO3 type hot springs in western Turkey, with the closest match being to the hot springs around Afyon-Gazligöl, which is consistent with documentary evidence. It is therefore proposed that the soda-rich salts produced by evaporating water from these springs to dryness would have provided the flux required for the production of Iznik glazes and high-boron Byzantine glasses
Isotopes on the beach by D Brems( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The evaporitic deposits of Lake Fazda (Wadi Natrun, Egypt) and their use in Roman glass production by Andrew J Shortland( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Long-term clay raw material selection and use in the region of Classical/ Hellenistic to Early Byzantine Sagalassos (SW Turkey) by B Neyt( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

High-resolution X-ray diffraction with no sample preparation( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : A novel, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique that provides completely non-destructive, high-quality XRD analyses of unprepared samples is demonstrated. The method shows great potential in the characterization of cultural heritage artefacts. Abstract : It is shown that energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) implemented in a back-reflection geometry is extremely insensitive to sample morphology and positioning even in a high-resolution configuration. This technique allows high-quality X-ray diffraction analysis of samples that have not been prepared and is therefore completely non-destructive. The experimental technique was implemented on beamline B18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Oxfordshire, UK. The majority of the experiments in this study were performed with pre-characterized geological materials in order to elucidate the characteristics of this novel technique and to develop the analysis methods. Results are presented that demonstrate phase identification, the derivation of precise unit-cell parameters and extraction of microstructural information on unprepared rock samples and other sample types. A particular highlight was the identification of a specific polytype of a muscovite in an unprepared mica schist sample, avoiding the time-consuming and difficult preparation steps normally required to make this type of identification. The technique was also demonstrated in application to a small number of fossil and archaeological samples. Back-reflection EDXRD implemented in a high-resolution configuration shows great potential in the crystallographic analysis of cultural heritage artefacts for the purposes of scientific research such as provenancing, as well as contributing to the formulation of conservation strategies. Possibilities for moving the technique from the synchrotron into museums are discussed. The avoidance of the need to extract samples from high-value and rare objects is a highly significant advantage, applicable also in other potential research areas such as palaeontology, and the study of meteorites and planetary materials brought to Earth by sample-return missions
Trace Element Analysis in Provenancing Roman Glass-Making( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : In this study, the use of trace elements as a provenance indicator for Roman natron glass is evaluated. Suitable glass-making sand raw materials are analysed for their trace elemental composition and compared to glass from known production centres. It is shown that the combined use of Nd isotopic and trace element analysis can be efficient for the provenancing of Roman glass. Trace elements associated with (de)colourants of glass are only present in small concentrations in glass-making sands. Background levels introduced to the glass by the sand raw material are defined and a lower threshold for the concentrations influenced by recycling is determined
 
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Audience level: 0.93 (from 0.87 for Medical tr ... to 0.99 for Isotopes o ...)

Languages
English (13)

Dutch (1)